Famous Authors Interviews – Words of Wisdom

Be prepared to be shocked… authors, even the extremely famous ones , are real people – like you and me. ¬†I know, shocking huh? ūüėČ

Honestly though, while I’m glued to my computer for my day job, I enjoy listening to interviews with these real people. Their¬†thoughts are inspiring and motivating – especially if you’re a writer too.

I was capitvated by J.K. Rowling’s interview with Oprah (see below). If you have 45 minutes it’s worth the watch (or listen, like I did). If not, I’ve included links to some other famous childrens author interviews I enjoyed (that are a lot shorter).

Be prepared though – you’ll want to write as soon as you’re done listening. Might want to save some time for that for later.

— click on the author’s name to see the video —

Author InterviewsJ.K. Rowling (Harry Potter series) -CLICK HERE-:

She is the ultimate rags to riches story. One of my favorite things about her is her ability to remember what life was like before fame and to not lose sight of that. So refreshing!

Jon Scieszka (True Story of the Three Little Pigs) – CLICK HERE-:

What a funny guy. I really enjoyed hearing his thoughts on reading and boys – how they struggle to read more than girls. I just enjoyed this interview in general, his happiness is contagious.

Jerry Spinelli (Maniac Magee, Stargirl) – CLICK HERE-:

I enjoy Spinelli’s writing style – so I was eager to hear his interview. I loved that hated¬†reading the required reading in school because I always struggled with that as well.

Beverly Cleary (Ramona and Beezus) – CLICK HERE-:

Beverly was a children’s librarian before becoming an author. She got in to writing because the children weren’t satisfied with the books that were available.¬†She never received a rejection letter – ever!

 Lois Lowry (The Giver) РCLICK HERE-:

Lois Lowry dropped out of college and finished after he children were all in school. She never submitted a story formally. She was approached by an editor and asked to try writing a story for children – which turned in to her first novel.

MoWillems+_74057
Mo Willems

Mo Willems (Elelphant and Piggie, Pigeon) -CLICK HERE-:

Mo fell into writing almost by accident, but man am I glad he did. I LOVE the Elephant Piggie series.

Katherine Paterson (Author of Bridge to Terabithia) -CLICK HERE-: 

She stresses the importance of reading as an author. She also talks about the real life death that inspired the book The Bridge to Terabithia.

Kate DiCamillo (Author of Because of Winn-Dixie, Mercy Watson) -CLICK HERE-: 

Kate says she loves to finish stories but doesn’t actually love to write them. Each morning she has to convince herself to get the writing done.¬†Man, I can relate to that some days.

Before you head off to to do some writing yourself, would you share comment below about something that motivates you to write? Thanks!

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DON’T TOUCH! This is MY reading time!

Hand Over the Books

I’m in that phase of life – the Tasmanian devil in a mini van phase. And the endless running around leaves me wondering how to follow the holy grail of advice to writers:

READ – read – READ!

I tried reading in the morning while I ate my cereal. Not my brightest idea. My day goes a little like this. I wake up long before the sun comes up and wake up my children (two who are far too peppy for 6 am). Then clothes and hair and teeth and lunches. Some shoe tying and shoe finding, then library book hunting – under the bed, under the couch – until we’re five minutes past go time. One says they never ate breakfast, so¬†I hand them an¬†apple and bread and shoo them out the door. Repeat the process two times for my middle schooler and high schooler – throw in a little driving faster than I should ’til that school zone sign comes in to view and you’ve got my morning (sounds familiar to any of you?). I¬†count it a¬†success if¬†my kids get in the front door before the bell rings, I mean, who’s really¬†looking if their socks match anyway? So…

Reading while I eat breakfast is out.

The rest of my day isn’t much slower. I work from home part-time, which sounds magical to everyone I tell and in many ways it is. But without¬†set work hours and no clear cut ‘coffee breaks’ and ‘lunch hours’ like¬†most office jobs –¬†reading while I work is not an option either.

Afternoon carpool is different. I have about fifteen minutes in the car before my kids come out. I used to try and squeeze in some writing here (and still do sometimes) but most often, I read. Repeat that twice for picking up my middle schooler and high schooler and I’ve got 30-40 minutes of reading under my belt.

Afternoon carpool reading is a GO!

Is it selfish that that’s not enough time to me? I crave a big, long chunk of reading time but almost never get it unless I do the following:

Swap TV/Internet zoning out for reading time.

With four kids and all the after school activities that come with that, sometimes there isn’t even TV time to swap. When I do choose a book over HGTV I’m always more satisfied. In reality, I wish I was one of those avid readers that always preferred a book over TV – but I’m not. Often¬†TV wins out, but I still think – especially on the channel flipping nights-¬†we should all do ourselves¬†a favor by turning it off and grabbing a book instead.

The only curse (or maybe it’s a blessing) I have with reading is¬†it puts me to sleep. Anyone else have this problem? When I read I calm down. My body seems to take that as a cue that it’s time to sleep. When I was reading the sixth Harry Potter book for the first time, I came¬†to the climactic seen in the tower – you know the one I’m talking about. One of the most pivotal scenes in the entire series, and what do I do mid-sentence? I fall asleep. I woke up four different times trying to finish the scene and couldn’t. ¬†I finally gave in to the sleep and finished the chapter when I woke. My husband¬†still teases me about that to this day.

Bedtime is my reading time.

My reading¬†curse makes bedtime a great time for reading. It helps me unwind and fall asleep faster. Before my husband convinced me to trying reading at bedtime I would lie in bed for nearly 45 minutes – waiting for the chatter in my head to quiet. Books quiet my¬†internal chatter¬†’til¬†all I hear is the story I’ve wrapped myself in.

Then…¬†I fall asleep.¬†ūüôā

Being a reader does not require ideal circumstances. Don’t let yourself or anyone around you try and convince you it does. Readers can come from any kind of life and any level of busy – you just have to want it bad enough.

When and where do you read?

Please comment below.

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6 reasons to be grateful you’re a writer NOW

With Thanksgiving being less than a day away, it seems only appropriate to list the reasons we should be grateful to be a writer now instead of decades ago.

Drum roll please.

Thanksgiving

 

1. We don’t have to use whiteout.

Typewriters and whiteout are fun to mess around with. ¬†The tick-tick-swuurrr is oddly soothing, but type a whole novel on that antique? NO WAY! I’m grateful for computers and not having to retype my entire manuscript when it’s time to revise.

 2. SO many books.

According to Nick Morgan on Forbes.com, there are 600,000 to 1,000,000 books published in the U.S. per year. And that’s added on top of the millions of books that already exist! The up side to this daunting number is¬†there will always be a plethora of¬†new¬†stories to read. Definitely something to be grateful for.

3.  Choose your own publication.

We should be grateful that today’s publishing market is a choose your own adventure. If you’d like a road full of rejection with the hope of a substantial advance -choose traditional publishing. Want to risk it all? Choose self-publishing. Or, if you want to have a writing assignment nagging at you multiple times a week the road to blogging is right for you.

 4. You can say that!?

I’m conservative. I don’t read books with risque stuff and can’t stomach most of Stephen King (even though I highly respect him as an author). I know that what I like you might hate and vice versa. So¬†thank you to today’s writing world for giving us variety to please every reader’s appetite.

5.  Spell check? Yes, please!

Yes, you too can have a super smart computer point out all your incomplete sentences and less than impressive spelling mistakes (insert sarcastic “Yay!”). Let’s be honest, having your word processor make you look like a grammar idiot¬†has got to be¬†much¬†less embarrassing than the live human being doing the same that writers of yesteryear had to face.

¬†6. ‘Cuz we are liv-ing in a – a digital world (did you hear Madonna too?)

While I swear writers are the only people who use stamps regularly when it’s not Christmas time – I’m very grateful that more and more publications have moved to electronic submissions. Now instead of obsessively checking my mailbox I can obsessively check my inbox too. Isn’t technology grand?

Happy Thanksgiving Y’all!

Comment below. Why are you¬†grateful you’re a writer now?

Getting off the Ropes

Last week I failed as a writer.

Last week, half my family was sick. My son had a birthday, there were meetings, hangouts, my job, my husbands jobs, school stuff, church stuff… yada, yada, yada.¬†All wonderful things and all exhausting. To add a little nuts to my life sundae I signed up for NaNoWriMo this month (which I ‘m loving, by the way) but when you have a week like I had there was no way in H-E- double hockey sticks that I was going to make my daily word count. And I didn’t.

Getting off the Ropes

This week I needed a pick me up. I needed a side rink, squirt in the mouth, slap in the face, ‘you can do this’ moment. So, in case you need a pick me up too, here’s some quotes that helped me get off the ropes. And some just made me laugh.

Thank you, Goodreads.


¬†‚ÄúIf you have any young friends who aspire to become writers, the second greatest favor you can do them is to present them with copies of The Elements of Style. The first greatest, of course, is to shoot them now, while they‚Äôre happy.‚ÄĚ

‚Äē Dorothy Parker, The Collected Dorothy Parker

‚ÄúNever annoy an inspirational author or you will become the poison in her pen and the villian in every one of her books.‚ÄĚ ‚Äē Shannon L. Alder

 

‚ÄúI have a pesky little critic in the back of my mind. He’s a permanent fixture and passes judgment on everything I write.

In order to placate him, especially when I’m endeavoring to write anything as ambitious as a novel, I have to constantly mutter, ‘I’m not writing a masterpiece, I’m not writing a masterpiece.’

This mantra lulls him into a kind of stupor so that he pays no attention to what I’m doing, because after all, I’m not claiming it’s any good. Slowly, and secretly, one page at a time, I write my story.

I know I’ve succeeded when he grudgingly admits, ‘That’s pretty good.’ And if I’m lucky, every once in a while, I blow him away.‚ÄĚ
‚Äē Rukhsana Khan

 

‚Äúi want to never settle for anything less than my soul on paper.‚ÄĚ ‚Äē Jonathan Culver

 

‚ÄúAuthors write books for one, and only one, reason: because we like to torture people.‚Ä̬†‚Äē Brandon Sanderson, Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians

 

‚Äúthey say that girls are the ones who want fairy tail endings, but then again, who are the authors of fairy tales? mostly men…‚ÄĚ ‚Äē Alina Radoi

 

‚ÄúPublishing a book is like being pregnant. By the end, you’re just ready to get that baby out!‚ÄĚ
‚Äē Carmen DeSousa

 

‚ÄúAuthors: The only people you thank for leaving you emotionally devastated.‚Ä̬†‚Äē Love The Stacks Bookstore

 

‚ÄúIf you have a dream, don‚Äôt just sit there. Gather courage to believe that you can succeed and leave no stone unturned to make it a reality.‚ÄĚ
‚Äē Roopleen

 


 

What quotes inspire you? Comment Below.

 

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Interview with a… character

Interview with a character

Fictional writers are crazy (someone¬†back me up here).¬†We hear voices in our heads – they tell us their stories and we write those stories down. That’s crazy at its finest, people! So, when my head is occupied by a character that won’t leave me be it seems only right to try and get to know them. I do it by interviewing them. Yup, just me, my laptop and that squatter in my head – having a little chat. Here’s the questions I like to ask.

CHARACTER INTERVIEW QUESTIONS:

1. What’s your name?

2. How old are you?

3. What do you look like?

4. Do you have any friends?

5. What about family? Tell me about them.

6. Do you like to try new things?

7. Are you shy?

8. What scares you?

9. What makes you angry?

10. What do you do when you’re angry?

11. What’s your biggest secret?

12. Any hidden talents?

13. Who do you long for?

14. Have you ever been in love?

15. What are you most proud of?

When I interview my characters I let the voice in my head¬†ramble, writing down every word. Their answers are eye opening! Some of the characters aren’t talkers, so their answers are short. Some ramble on for ever. Some are sarcastic and you can hear that in their replies. Others are serious and straightforward. I even find that as the character unfolds for me through these questions, I add on other questions – like “tell me about where you’re from” (especially for my fantasy characters). Or for my school based characters, I like to ask them about school.

These questions are really just a springboard to get the conversation started. They help me get to know my characters more intricately so I can write them in better detail, making them fuller and richer than they would have been otherwise.

Now it’s time to interview you ¬†-your answers can go in the comments below ūüėČ ¬† ¬† ¬†¬†So… tell me how you get to know the characters living in your head? What’s your method?

Want some other interview ideas? Try these sites:

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Writing what you know… kind of.

Write what you know quote

My husband¬†suggested I write a book about when I was a teenager and had¬†bad skin. I panicked. Every teenager has bad skin, sure, but for me hiding that “imperfection” became an obsession. And not a very healthy one.¬†Our conversation went a little like this.

“You want me to bare my soul so that anyone that reads my book will know every detail of my inner craziness?”

“Yes.”

“No way. That’s too much. That’s putting too much of me out there.”

He paused (it’s always a long pause with him). “You do know you don’t have to write a story about someone¬†exactly¬†like you. Your character doesn’t have to have the¬†exact¬†same insecurity as you did.”

I wanted to say – yea, of course I know that. But in reality,¬†I hadn’t thought of it ’til then.

He continued. “Just write all the emotion you felt connected with your experience but apply it to another insecurity. Make that¬†their story.”

Duh.

How I hadn’t thought of this before then is beyond me, but knowing it has changed my approach on writing what I know. Here’s some of my new found truths.

Writing what you know doesn’t mean your novel is a page from your journal.¬†My husband put it best, take the emotion from your life experiences, take the likeness of people who influenced you, maybe even set your novel in your old neighborhood, but you don’t have to write your story exactly.

joy

Writing what you know does mean tapping in to your wealth of past emotions.¬†How many of you¬†know heartbreak? Or want? Or embarrassment? What about elation? Or pride for someone you love?¬†¬†You may have experienced these emotions at times in your life that don’t translate in to great story ideas, but the emotion can. Emotion is what makes characters feel human, tangible. Take what you know about those emotions and write that.

Writing what you know doesn’t have to just be from your own personal experiences. I have never known divorce, but I saw my friends live through divorce as a child. As a teenager, I saw friends with divorced parents dreading¬†going to one parents house that weekend. I’ve seen grown friends go through divorce and the heartbreak there. These aren’t my life experiences, but I can still draw from them.¬†With a little bit of puzzle work, I can take those experiences that I’ve¬†seen and apply them just as readily in my writing as I can something that I experienced first hand.

Writing what you know should stretch you. Often the first piece an author gets published is based on a personal experience. It’s true for me. My story,¬†The School Lunch that Almost Killed Me¬†is based on me in third grade – only I loved turkey gravy and rice, not pea soup. While that was not a hard experience to share, there¬†will be some that we hesitate sharing. I recommend we find the courage to share those¬†stories – powerful stuff can come from it.

The main purpose of writing what we know is to make our stories feel alive, human. Nothing can accomplish that better than when we infuse our characters with¬†real¬†experiences, real¬†emotions and the real¬†life as we see it around us everyday. Or as Coca-Cola puts it,¬†“Can’t Beat the Real Thing.”

 

Was the first thing you published based on a personal experience? Tell us more about it below.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: ¬†“Did you say no? I heard yes”¬†–¬†Click Here¬†

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Singing in the Rain: Your Mood and Writing.

My current work in progress is a series of humorous early chapter books about ¬†a kindergartner who’s imagination gets him in trouble. Readers will hopefully¬†walk away smiling and laughing. The¬†problem? Sometimes I just don’t want to write humorous stuff. Sometimes I have tired days or grumpy days or “enter at your own risk” days – and I can’t squeeze one bit of funny out of me.¬†I’ll assume I’m not the only one who has these slumps? Right?

(Please say I’m right – or this post is about to get embarrassing!)

happy_umbrella_by_dannyst600_397

So, here’s the thought: ¬†How do we, as writers, keep on writing when our emotions contradict what our current work needs?

To me, how to approach it depends on the project. If the project has a deadline and has to get done, you’re going to have to approach things differently than if you’re writing free of restraints. Here’s how I approach the two.

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1. IF THE PROJECT HAS A DEADLINE: I find something that helps me shake off the bad mood.

I can’t stay in a bad mood long when I listen to dance music. It’s inconceivable (insert Princess Bride lisp). Some of my peppy song choices drive my husband a little bonkers, but they do the trick and get me smiling again – ready for thinking of witty, six-year old dialogue.

Meditation works great for me too. I’m religious, so scripture study and prayer are usually involved, but if you’re not religious there are many other forms of meditation that work well too for altering moods.

Last of all, I get up and move. Specifically, I get outside. I have a hard time being down when I catch the dusty smell right before a rain. Or see a tree bowing in the wind as I walk past. My favorite is the evening sun blazing through a filter of green oak leaves. Ooh Рwalks are good for the soul and the mood!

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2. IF THE PROJECT IS FREE OF RESTRAINTS: I let it rest and move on for awhile.

I’m an¬†over thinker; which is a wicked curse (unless you’re planning a big family outing on a budget – really handy there). I find when I force myself to work on a piece that I’m not “feeling,” I over work it. I edit where is doesn’t need it. I hyper focus on details or scenes that don’t need that much attention. I’ve found that if I’m not in the mood to work on a specific piece that I … (drum roll, please) … usually need a break from it. And I take it.

I keep writing though! Sometime I write a short story featuring a character is a similar mood as me. Other times, I look for scenes in my back burner projects that could benefit from my mindset. It keeps me writing without tainting my current work (or making lots of unnecessary fixes for myself later).

And, of course, all of the ideas in #1 work great here too.

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I guess I’m hoping you’ll see that off moods don’t have to turn into writers block. There are ways to work around them – ways to keep yourself in motion and your projects moving forward. Then,¬†if all else fails… there’s always dance music.

It’s catchy. I promise.

Discussion Time:

How do you write through your mood changes? What’s that one thing that puts you in the right mood when you have to keep going? Please share your thoughts below!

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Writing Basics that Work

I’ve done my fair share of web surfing. My fair share of looking for the writing “diamond in the ruff” that works for me. Below are three¬†tried and true writing basics that will help every author become a better author (or just get that darn manuscript finished).

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#1 – Be consistent

Writing Basics that Work - Busy-620x483

How you define consistency is 100% dependent on you and your life. But every author (yes, every author) needs their version of routine to be successful at this craft.

I’ve tried all sorts of routines. The early morning, butt glued in the chair, write or die method. I’ve tried the late night, half asleep, slap the face and keep going method. I’ve even tried the method of locking myself in my room with a sign on the door for the kids that says: “No blood? No Broken Bone? No Enter.” All these methods had their perks, and all had downfalls (my 5 year old laying outside my door screaming for me to let her in while my husband tried to coax her back downstairs was one of the big downfall).

Given my full and crazy life, I’ve learn to snack write. I’m never entirely sure when I’ll have time to write, but I seize the moments I get and try my darnedest to write every day.¬†

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#2- Read. A LOT.

Writing Basics - Read

If any of you are working parents, like me, finding time to write (let alone read) can seem near impossible. But good reading does make better writing. I don’t find it coincidental that many authors, especially beginning ones, reflect¬†their favorite author’s style in their own writing. It’s a good place to start. And hopefully it eventually carries them to find their own voice.

Reading also inspires you to write. Don’t believe me? Try it. ¬†Next time you have a slump in your writing, re-read a book that once struck your internal tuning fork. Just see if you can stop yourself from wanting to write.

Don’t limit yourself to paper or e-books. Audio books are great for commuters or busy parents like me who live in a car – driving one carpool after another. ¬†I also¬†listen to books¬†while I’m cleaning the house – laundry’s not nearly as awful with a great book on in the background.

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#3 – Write – for goodness sakes, WRITE!

Writing Basics - Write

What? Did I really put that? Seems a tad obvious..hmm?

Well … it is.

But I know that I’m not the only writer that has gotten caught in the research whirlpool then wondered why my word count for that day was so low. You know what distractions you have to turn off to make you focus, so now, you just have to do it. Every day (or whatever version of consistently you have).

To keep your writing flowing you also have to stop editing yourself. ¬†Especially with that first draft. Make a mess! Know it’s not going to look great! Little secret here that some writers forget… no one has to see that first draft. No one. Your goal simple needs to be to finish it. Then, when revision time rolls around, you can spit shine it all you want. But first, you write.

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On that note. ¬†This would be a great time to close this blog and get back to your writing¬†(but not until you’ve left a comment below¬†‘cuz¬†I’d love to hear if you’ve got any other writing basics that are must haves for you).

Please tell me your thoughts below.

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NaNo – NaNo – NaNoWriMo

Am I the only one that thinks of Mork and Mindy whenever someone talks about NaNoWriMo?

Mork and Mindy

Let’s just push past how old I’m feeling at this moment and get to the good stuff. A great blog post, by someone else.

I have never participated in NaNoWriMo, but just signed up to do it this year, all because of Liana Brooks blog post on Critique Circle. She took what ¬†seemed like a monstrous feat and chopped it up into tangible tasks. I’m working on Step 5 right now¬†and kind of wish I could dive into the writing already.

So, without further ramblings, here’s the good stuff. I do caution…¬†once you get to the end of this post you might feel crazy enough to sign up too. You have been warned!

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NaNoWriMo – National Novel Writing Month – can we be honest for a second? You are only doing NaNo for one of three reasons:

1) You need to get into a daily writing habit and writing 1666 words a day for a month is a good way of developing that habit.

2) You need to get a big chunk of writing done in a hurry and 50,000 words in a month ain’t a full novel for most genres, but it ain’t too shabby either.

3) You’re friends are threatening to steal your fuzzy socks and your chocolate stash if you don’t join.

See, the 50,000 words you get when you win NaNoWriMo aren’t the prize, they’re the byproduct. Winning NaNoWriMo means spending the month of November turning yourself into a better writer. And I want to help you be a winner.

There’s pages and pages of writing advice on the internet. You could read books on writing, and nuance, and metaphor. If you’re lucky you’ll spend your entire life reading great books and learning from other authors, but not amount of learning is going to help you get off the starting block and to writing a book unless you know where to start. So that’s what this post is about: how to prep for NaNoWriMo.

Mid-October you need to set aside a day for NaNoWriMo planning. You’re going to be doing your research, basic plotting, and some very simple outlining. It you’re a Plotter who needs to have all the details written down, fine, add more. If you’re a Pantster (like me!) you’ll find this method isn’t overwhelming and leaves lots of room for improvisation. Once you’ve got your date set grab something to make notes on and give yourself five hours to work… and yes it’s perfectly fine to do this in fifteen minute increments over the month of October. You’re busy, and that’s normal. ūüôā

Step 1: Write the elevator pitch for your novel.

Don’t get hung up on finding an original plot or the perfect pitch right now. Just pick an idea that tickles your imagination and run with it. The fact that you are writing it will make it unique. Every person is different, and so is every story!

– In two sentences or less write what you’re going to write your book about. It doesn’t need to be perfect, you just need to verbalize it somehow.

– If you don’t know what to write about look for inspiration in art work, online story prompts, the NaNoWriMo Adopt A Plot forum, or on Tumblr where the Out Of Context D&D people give anyone with a pulse an urge to write fantasy.

– Can’t decide on just one plot? No problem! Plan them all out. Start writing whichever catches your fancy in November and write the others next year.

Step 2: Use the Dime Novel Formula

This is 100% stolen from the author of the Doc Savage novels Kenneth Robeson (Lester Dent) and he deserves full credit. Partial credit goes to British author Tim Dedopulos who wrote a NaNoWriMo post in 2010 entitled How To Write A Novel In Three Days. We’re using a modified version of his method….

– Lester Dent said every good novel needed four things: A new way to kill someone, a new thing for the villain to want, a new place, and a menace that threatens your hero at every turn.

– Write down your four things.

Step 3: You Need Four Plot Twists

No one likes a book where they can guess the ending on page one. It’s boring. Plot twists set in the right place along the course of the book will give your reader a wild ride that keeps them reading long past bedtime. Plan on at least four plot twists.

–¬†Plot twist #1¬†comes in the first quarter of the book. “You’re a wizard, Harry.” “I found a wardrobe that leads to a kingdom of snow and my brother ate the evil queen’s Turkish Delight!” etc. You get the idea.

–¬†Plot Twist #2¬†comes about 40% of the way through the book, this one’s the gut punch. The hero loses something, they’re betrayed, something horrible happens and at all cost you must leave the readers thinking there is no way your hero can ever find a happy ending after this. If you’re George R. R. R. Martin this is where you kill [spoiler redacted], you soulless fiend.

–¬†Plot Twist #3¬†comes at the climax of the story, when the fate of the universe hangs by a thread, and then suddenly PLOT TWIST! something amazing happens. Harry comes back from the dead. Loki really didn’t kill Thor. Mulan shoots Shan Yu with a firework and the Emperor bows to her.

–¬†Plot Twist #4… and I know you’re scratching your head here… this one comes in the last pages of the book. The villain confesses they did it all for the love of the hero, the hero pulls the sword from the stone and finds out it’s plastic, the long-lost princess realizes she rescued the wrong kingdom! This is the very final twist that keeps the book alive after the last page is turned. It may seem diabolic, especially if you’re not writing a series, but it lets the reader believe the characters will live on and have more adventures even after the book ends, and that’s important.

Step 4: You Need Three Villains

Early in my writing career I wrote several novels that were great except the pacing and tension seemed almost nonexistent. It wasn’t until I wrote a book with a well fleshed out villain that I realized my early novels suffered from a lack of antagonist. Save yourself some tears and define your villains up front.

– Who is your Primary Antagonist? This is the villain that shows up one page one and gives our hero grief but who may not be a villain all along. If you’re writing an Enemies-To-Lovers romance this antagonist will wind up being a hero in the end.

– ¬†Who is your Second Antagonist? The Middle Villain, is the one who comes in the center of the book (hence the name) and who the hero didn’t see as a problem beforehand. Either this antagonist was a friend before and betrayed the hero, or they become a villain because of the hero’s actions in achieving the first quest of the book. This antagonist carries a lot of weight and deals the hero the most set backs. They’re the one that drives the hero to the moment of despair and strips them of everything (which is why a betrayer makes such a good second villain). While dealing with the second antagonist the hero stumbles into a realization of who the bigger villain is. If you’re writing a series with One Big Villain driving the series (think Kate Daniels series by Ilona Andrews or Star Wars where the Emperor is the Big Bad) you’ll have the hero defeat a series of Middle Villains in each book and only face The One Big Bad in the final book. If you’re writing a series driven by Hero’s Choice this second villain will bounce between being a villain and being a temporary ally (think the Mercy Thompson series by Patricia Briggs or Star Trek where Romulans and Klingons are sometimes enemies and sometimes friends). The other series option is the No Hero series like Game of Thrones where everyone is an antagonist and a protagonist in their own mind.

– Who is the Third Antagonist? The Big Bad, the villain whose presence is felt but unknown throughout the book. In a series, you may not see this person until the end of the series. The best part about this kind of antagonist is it invites readers to reread so they can catch the earlier clues. You really can save this villain for the very end, or at least the last 1/3 of the book. They usually appear around the hero’s Moment Of Despair, when the hero has lost all hope, friends, support, and belief in themself. This is the villain that defines the hero. Because the hero looks up from the mud and blood and despair and say, “I cannot let you do this. I cannot let you win even if I lose everything.” The decision to fight this villain when all hope is lost, at great personal sacrifice, is what makes an ordinary person a hero. And because the hero is coming from such a low point, beaten and fragile, their victory is all the more sweet in the end.

*Whew! Got all that? Okay. Good. Take a breather because the next section is there we’re going to tackle the nitty gritty. You ready?*

Step 5: Building The World

Do you know what derails the most NaNoWriMo novelists? The research. They pause to look up a name, or find a place to set a scene, and then they’re lost down the rabbit hole of research and you find them wandering bookstores in mid-January wondering why people are hanging Valentine’s Day decorations. It’s sad, really. And you, smarty that you are, are going to dodge that bullet by naming everything right now!

– Make a list of 25 female names and 25 male names for your book. You can do it by culture or race if you need to, but get it done before November 1st. And, remember, if you hate the name November 15th you can change it in edits. That’s why we have the Search-Replace function.

– Make a list of all the modes of transport in your book. If you have spaceships or sailing vessels make a list of names for them too. Ten minimum. More is better. Pick a theme if you’re having trouble, like naming all the ships in your fleet after minerals: Jasper, Feldspar, Malachite…

– Make a list of all the places you might set a scene. Name the cafes, name the fields, name the forests, name the nebulas, name the schools, name the rooms. You may not use them all but they’ll be there if you need them.

– Make a list of all your props: weapons, clothes, whatever will be on stage goes right here. If it helps, pretend you’re planning a play. Picture what you might need. And feel free to add more when you start writing. These lists are guidelines only, you can use them or lose them to your heart’s content.

Step 6: The Setting Thesaurus

This is going to take a bit of time, so plan ahead. What you need to do here is follow the excellent example set by Becca and Angela and make a thesaurus for all the scenes.

– Honestly, this is more for the Plotters who need to know everything. Pantsters, write five or six key words to describe each place, one for each major sense. If you have more or have something you really want to see in that place, scribble it down.

РBookmark the Emotion Thesaurus and Setting Thesaurus in case of emergencies in November.

Step 7: Time For The Math

NaNoWriMo is meant to be thirty days of steady writing, but let’s be realistic, unless you’re life is perfect you won’t be writing all thirty days. Look at your calendar right now and decide how many days you can write. For me is about 24 days in November. I take weekends off to spend time with my kids and I’ll be too busy cooking on Thanksgiving to write.

– Grab a calculator. Divide 50,000 by the number of days you have to write. This number is your target word count if you want to have 50,000 words at the end of the month.

– 50,000 isn’t a full novel for adult genres and most YA. If you really want a novel in a month you need to do that math with 75,000 words. I’m sorry.

– Curse yourself. Cry. Google WRITE OR DIE. Thank the creators of WRITE OR DIE for all they have done for you. Bookmark WRITE OR DIE. Tell your family and friends you love them, and then go buy some note cards.

Step 8: The Dread Outline

This trick I actually picked up from a fellow Critique Circle writer my first year participating in NANOWRIMO. She said she spent Halloween night handing out candy and writing scenes on a note card. One card per writing day with all the scenes she needed to write.

– Let’s pretend you have 25 writing days in November and you want 50,000 words. That’s 2000 words on each of your writing days, or one scene per day.

– Pick out 25 cards and write one or two sentences describing a scene you want to write on each card.

– Put a small sticker or check mark on Plot Twist days and mark the days on your calendar. You’ll probably be writing a plot twist on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th of November.

– Rearrange, discard, or rewrite anything that doesn’t seem to make sense.

– REMEMBER! This is only the rough draft. It’s meant to be rough. You are aiming to write something ugly. Everything will be smoothed and polished in edits. These cards can be changed at any time, they’re really here to be your count down clock to victory. No panicking allowed.

Step 9: Write Like A Pro

Can I share a teeny tiny little secret with you? There’s not an author alive who knows what they’re doing. That blank page is just as blank for you as it is for your favorite author. Every person is unique. Every person will write differently and in different ways. There is no wrong way to be an author.

– Sit down.

– Write.

– All the planning you did, that’s there for reference. All those lists and names and plot twists were written down so your subconscious could have time to play with the ideas and present you with the scenes when it’s time to write. On November 1st all you have to do is show up and write.

– If you get stuck, check your notes.

– If you go running down a new avenue just make sure to connect with your plot twist.

– Never abandon your villains, they’re what makes your hero a hero.

– Write.

– Keep writing.

– Don’t give up.

– Have fun.

Sign up for NaNoWriMo 2014 here.

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Wham! Hitting the Publishing Brick Wall

Do you have any friends that run? Not jog around the block, but really run?

I know a few. ¬†I have an aunt that just finished a¬†200 miles race (yes, that sounds crazy to me too). And another friend that¬†marathon hops. Dedicated runners, like these two,¬†typically¬†love¬†the process – the prep for the race, the energy of race day, the high that comes after finishing. Sure, they may have bad days, but as a whole they love knowing¬†they can do hard things. But all marathon runner, even these dedicated ones, have that dreaded mile where they hit a¬†“brick wall” – that mile¬†where they question their sanity and wonder “If I quit and walk into those¬†onlookers over there, will¬†anyone actually notice?”

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Publishing¬†a story, especially a novel,¬†is a marathon too. Just ask anyone who’s finished one. Maybe they get easier the more you finish, you seasoned pros will have to chime in on that one, but I still hit a brick wall with each and every one.

I recognize that every¬†writer has a different “brick wall,” ¬†and everyone has their own way of climbing over it. So that’s what I’d love to discuss today.¬†What’s your writing brick wall along the path to publication?

My brick wall is submission. I enjoy brainstorming a work, fleshing it out, writing that first draft, polishing it up… fun, fun, fun. Then – I get stuck and the voices in my head start talking: “You spent how much time making up a story? Do remember you’re a mother? Was that really the best use of your time?” or the one that plagues me most – “You honestly think that’s good enough to sell? You sure you¬†don’t want to go edit that some more?” (my voices¬†can be pretty ruthless). I’d like to say I have a magical fix for my own publishing brick wall, but I don’t. Instead, I’ve learned to accept my weakness and use it¬†to my advantage.

While I’m pretty methodical with my daily have-to-dos, when I’m dreading something (like submitting a manuscript), I procrastinate. Big time.¬†So, how do I use procrastination to my advantage?

I work in spurts.

I’m someone who has to get everything done, just has to. So, while I may be a procrastinator, I also know it will all get done… eventually. ¬†When I hit my brick wall, I sit and wait for that magical time¬†when I’m sick of procrastinating and actually¬†want to play catch up. Then I pounce and put myself in overdrive. I tackle all those half done cover letters, tell my voices to shut their yaps, deem my manuscripts “good enough” and send them on their way.¬†My “intensive spurts” method isn’t¬†for everyone, especially those with looming deadlines, but it works great for me.

Now on to you:

What’s your brick wall? And how do you¬†get past it?

Please comment below.

Your fix might be the answer another writer is looking for!

 

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